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Worlds Top 5 Greenest Electronics Companies.

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Worlds Top 5 Greenest Electronics Companies.
« on: Nov 19, 2010, 05:59 PM »
Here are the top electronics companies that are ecologically top as well help the nature. Here are the Top 5 from the release of October Edition of Greenpeace.org.

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1. Nokia :

Nokia stays in 1st place with the same score of 7.5. Overall, Nokia does best on the toxic chemicals criteria, followed by energy, and does least well on e-waste issues. Nokia scores very well on toxic chemical issues; all its new models have been free of PVC since the end of 2005, and all new models of mobile phones and accessories launched in 2010 are on track to be free of brominated compounds, chlorinated flame retardants and antimony trioxide, therefore achieving its goal to phase out these substances. However, despite Nokia's support for further restrictions for chlorinated and brominated substances in legislation, it fails to score for its position on the RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics) Directive, as it does not openly support restrictions on at least PVC vinyl plastic, chlorinated flame retardants (CFRs) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in the next 3-5 years i.e. in RoHS 2.0.

2. Sony Ericsson

Sony Ericsson remains in 2nd place, with the same score of 6.9. It is the best performer on the toxic chemicals criteria of all the ranked brands, being the first to score full marks on all chemicals criteria. It also does well on energy. All Sony Ericsson products are already free from PVC vinyl plastic and brominated flame retardants (BFRs), with the exception of a few components that are still being phased out. Sony Ericsson has already met the challenge of the new criterion on chemicals by banning antimony, beryllium and phthalates from new models launched since January 2008. Moreover, Sony Ericsson is proactively lobbying in the EU for the revision of the RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics) Directive to adopt a 3 to 5 year timeline for further restrictions on organo-chlorine and bromine substances.

3. Philips

Philips stays in 3rd place, with an increased score of 5.5, up from 5.1. Philips gains points for launching an LED TV that is free from PVC and BFRs, the first product in this category to be free from these hazardous substances. Philips also has a shaver range and adapters that are PVC and BFR-free, TVs with PVC/BFR-free housings (EU market only so far, for nearly 2 years), as well as PVC/BFR-free Senseo and oral healthcare products and a PVC-free remote control.

Philips scores well on toxic chemical issues; it has committed to eliminating PVC vinyl plastic and all brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in all its new product models by the end of 2010, and six types of phthalates and antimony by 31 December 2010. Beryllium and its compounds are already restricted; arsenic has been eliminated from TV glass and other display products from 2008. However, it fails to support the need for the RoHS 2.0 Directive (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics, currently being revised) to adopt an end-of-life focused methodology for adding new substances and an immediate ban on organo-chlorine and bromine compounds.


4. HP

HP climbs to 4th place from 8th with an increased score of 5.5 (up from 4.9), as a result of its progress in bringing products that are free from PVC and BFRs onto the market and a new commitment to phase out beryllium and compounds by July 2011. HP now has many PVC and BFR-free products on the market, including a desktop PC with PVC-free power supply, several series of notebooks, another desktop and two LCD monitors. It has also recently launched the first PVC free printer. To gain top marks for its halogen-free products, HP now needs to phase out PVC and BFRs from its whole product line. HP also scores well for its support for improvements to the revised EU RoHS Directive (Restriction of Hazardous Substances in electronics); specifically, to adopt restrictions on PVC vinyl plastic and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) as a focus for the restriction of chlorine and bromine from electrical and electronic products. HP believes restrictions of PVC and BFRs in RoHS may be possible in 2015 as long as specific issues and exemptions are addressed.

5. Samsung

Samsung rejoins the leaders in the Guide, rising from 13th place to 5th, as a result of one of its penalty points being lifted and improvements in its score on chemicals. It remains encumbered by one penalty point, which was first imposed in v.14 of the Guide for backtracking on its commitment to eliminate brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in new models of all products by January 2010 and PVC vinyl plastic by end of 2010. The second penalty point, served in v.15 for misleading its customers and Greenpeace by not admitting that it would not meet its public commitment until the timeline for that commitment had passed, has been lifted.

Here are the full results:
http://www.greenpeace.org/international/campaigns/toxics/electronics/how-the-companies-line-up/

foxy1

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Re: Worlds Top 5 Greenest Electronics Companies.
« Reply #1 on: Dec 14, 2010, 05:08 PM »
Impressive but note that it is the richest, most successful companies who can afford to be green!

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Re: Worlds Top 5 Greenest Electronics Companies.
« Reply #2 on: Dec 14, 2010, 07:22 PM »
Yup that's true.